Shelley MacDonald Large Bronze Modern Ulu Earrings

On September 29, 2016, Kate wore these handmade earrings created by Canadian goldsmith Shelley MacDonald.

Photo credit: Shelley MacDonald
Photo credit: Shelley MacDonald

The earrings are designed after the knife traditionally used by Inuit, Yup’ik and Aleut women. Traditionally it was made with caribou antler, muskox horn or walrus ivory. In contemporary times, the handle is still made with caribou antler but the blades are made with steel.

Shelley’s designs are handmade by Shelley herself and come in bronze or silver. She offers Small earrings ($49.52 for bronze and $57.25 for silver) and Large earrings ($73.50 for bronze and $88.97 for silver).

Here is an interview conducted by Gemma for What Would Kate Do?  with Ms. MacDonald.

An Interview with Shelley MacDonald, Designer of the Ulu Earrings

 

Advertisements

Patrick Mavros Crocodile Stud Silver Earrings

Another NYC debut, Kate wore these to a conservation reception at the British Consul General Residence.

Photo credit: www.patrickmavros.com
Photo credit: http://www.patrickmavros.com

 

From the website: “As a family, we have a deep fascination for crocodiles. They are remarkable creatures – remaining physiologically unchanged for a hundred million years. The element of danger surrounding crocodiles has always intrigued us. This range of jewellery captivates an ancient African mystique and the tactile feel of each piece has an exciting and exotic appeal.”

These are made of solid sterling silver. Anna of My Small Obsessions owns these earrings and according to her they are quite heavy.

Here they are on Kate.

Photo credit: Splash News
Photo credit: Splash News

The large pair costs £130 or about $199 USD.

I think these are quite cute. It’s a whimsical design, having a silver crocodile biting on the edge of your ear. 🙂

Patrick Mavros Ndoro Dangle Silver Earrings

Kate wore these long, dangly earrings a few times before her engagement.

Photo credit: www.patrickmavros.com
Photo credit: http://www.patrickmavros.com

 

From the website: :” Ndoro Dangle Earrings Ndoro found in Zimbabwe can be divided into two separate categories. Firstly, the original marine mollusc of the genus Conus Virgo or the calcareous Operculum of large marine snails such as Conus Turbo and secondly, the mass produced factory copies of the natural mollusc.
Having established themselves on the Mozambique coast and started trade links with the interior, the Portuguese first learned of the value placed upon the ndoro which, because of its scarcity, was much sought after. The Portuguese took advantage of this demand by introducing large quantities of the natural mollusc ndoro and, later, mass-produced factory ceramic and porcelain copies. Portuguese traders of the sixteenth, seventeenth and later centuries are believed to have exchanged ndoro for gold, ivory and other goods. Most of the ndoro found in Zimbabwe today are the ceramic or porcelain copies of the natural ndoro.
Perhaps the earliest written reference to the ndoro can be found in the journals of a sixteenth century Portuguese chronicler who observed that: “The Monomatapa and the Macarangas and their vassals wear on their foreheads a white shell, as a jewel, strung from the hair, and the Monomatapa wears another large shell on his chest. They call these shells Andoros.”
According to a colourful legend, the ndoro played a dramatic role in the early history of Zimbabwe. At some time in the fifteenth century, it helped in a battle. The story goes that a descendant of Mutota, the apparent founder of the Munhumutapa dynasty, was trying to subjugate a rival king named Karuva. Discovering, through a spy, that Karuva held the ndoro in great awe and respect, he ordered his warriors to wear ndoro upon their foreheads as they marched into battle against Karuva’s forces. On seeing the ndoro-ornamented soldiers approach, Karuva became confused, and the tide of the battle turned against him.
In the north east of Zimbabwe there is much oral history suggesting that ndoro were brought into the country by the Muzungu or Gouveias, by which is meant Portuguese traders, from Mozambique. Ndoro were used by chiefs in Shona society as symbols of rank and authority and as signifiers of wealth.
I have used the Ndoro shape in many of my jewellery designs including chains, pendants and earrings. Silver Ndoros age beautifully and always have that African look and feel to them..”

These are made of five ndoro-shaped sterling silver pieces arrange in a single line. Instead of a hook, it appears that these attach to the earlobe on a post secured in the back with an earring back.

Kate wore them to a couple of polo matches in 2009.

Photo credit: http://katemiddletons.com/
Photo credit: http://katemiddletons.com/

 

Photo credit: www.afroccentric.com
Photo credit: http://www.afroccentric.com

 

The cost of these is £150 or $228.

Monica Vinader Riva Diamond Cluster Drop Earrings

Accompanying the matching necklace, these are the earrings Kate wore to the Wildlife Photography of the Year gala

Photo credit: www.monicavinader.com
Photo credit: http://www.monicavinader.com

From the website: “Featuring Riva’s signature organic shape and pave set diamonds totalling 0.32 carats, these cocktail earrings are beautifully elegant. Measuring approximately 27mm (1.0″) in length x 35mm (1.4″) in width, the earrings are light enough to wear all day long. Match with other rose gold Riva pieces for effortless style.”

Just like the necklace, the earrings are rose gold over sterling silver. The front of the earrings are covered in tiny white diamonds. The four unusual-shaped hoops are connected with small rose gold links (also vermeil). French hooks are attached to the earring’s main section. The front of the hooks are in an elongated teardrop shape instead of the more common slim wire we often see on dangle earrings.

You can see what the back looks like here.

Photo credit: www.monicavinader.com
Photo credit: http://www.monicavinader.com

Here they are on Kate:

Photo credit: www.whatkatewore.com
Photo credit: http://www.whatkatewore.com

 

Photo credit: www.elcorreo.com
Photo credit: http://www.elcorreo.com

She wore them again on May 4, 2016 to visit the National Portrait Gallery for the Vogue 100.

Photo credit: www.whatkatewore.com
Photo credit: http://www.whatkatewore.com

 

The cost of these earrings is $1,190

 

Monica Vinader Riva Diamond Cluster Bib Necklace

Kate wore this necklace to the National History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year gala in October 2014.

It’s a gorgeous necklace and I hope to see it again during one of her future engagements.

Update: She wore this to the National Portrait Gallery on May 4, 2016 to view Vogue `100. 

Photo credit: www.monicavinader.com
Photo credit: http://www.monicavinader.com

 

According to the website, it’s “18ct Rose Gold Plated Vermeil on Sterling Silver in Diamond:.

From Monica Vinader: “Featuring Riva’s signature organic shape in 21 interconnecting hoops, and pavé set diamonds totalling 0.84 carats, this bib is the epitome of elegance. Measuring approximately 11cm in length by 5.5cm in width, with an adjustable 18 inch chain, this statement piece looks beautiful teamed with the Riva Diamond Cluster Drop Earrings.”

The hoops are an interesting shape. They’re far from perfectly round, and each hoop is shaped differently from its sibling. They are also sized differently.

This necklace is certainly one of the more unique pieces Kate has worn since getting married.

Kate wore this with her lovely pale jade Jenny Packham dress and LK Bennett shoes. I am totally in love with this dress. I’m looking forward to seeing her don it at another event.

Photo credit: www.whatkatewore.com
Photo credit: http://www.whatkatewore.com

You can view her dress and shoes below.

Photo credit: www.mirror.co.uk
Photo credit: http://www.mirror.co.uk

 

 

From the Daily Mail: “And then, in 2014, Monica hit the jackpot. The Duchess of Cambridge – who, let’s face it, isn’t short of jewellery options – wore the designer’s Riva collection earrings (£745) and necklace (£2,000) to an evening gala at the Natural History Museum.

‘I knew nothing about it as my press team had lent them to her people and they’d told them to tell no one else in the company,’ says Monica.

Monica’s mobile didn’t stop buzzing with texts, while the UK offices received a flurry of calls and emails through the night, and the rest of the collection sold out in the U.S. that evening. 

‘It doesn’t get any bigger than her,’ Monica smiles.”

I am assuming that these were purchased from Monica Vinader at some point after the gala at the National History Museum. I know that Kate prefers to pay designers for their merchandise and almost never accepts gifts.

She wore this to the National Portrait Gallery on May 4, 2016.

Photo credit: www.whatkatewore.com
Photo credit: http://www.whatkatewore.com

The cost of this is $3.,200.

Claudia Bradby Rose Quartz and Amazonite Camellia Necklace

Kate worked for Jigsaw from 2006 to 2007 as an accessories buyer. During this time, she collaborated with jewelry designer Claudia Bradby to create a new design of necklace for Jigsaw’s junior section.

Kate also wore one of Claudia Bradby’s necklaces for a time. Her chosen necklace was the Camellia.

Photo credit: Splash Images
Photo credit: Splash Images

 

Photo credit: www.claudiabradby.com
Photo credit: http://www.claudiabradby.com

 

From the website: “The design that caught the eye of Kate Middleton, our amazonite and rose quartz on sterling silver hoop necklace is an exquisite piece of jewellery that will accesorise your wardrobe beautifully. Length 81.5cm.

Rose quartz and amazonite are both associated with love and said to balance the emotions and promote calm.”

It’s a rather fun and colorful necklace. It features silver hoops throughout a long silver chain. Some of the hoops are fitted with either a round rose quartz stone or a round amazonite stone.

Kate casually wore this necklace throughout 2007, sometimes pairing it with her more costly Asprey 167 Button pendant.

Photo credit: http://www.catherine-middleton.us/photos/index.php
Photo credit: http://www.catherine-middleton.us/photos/index.php

 

The cost of this necklace is £207 or $325.

Links of London Effervescence Bubble Stiletto Earrings

Kate first wore these earrings to the Ark Gala in 2011.

Photo credit: www.linksoflondon.com
Photo credit: http://www.linksoflondon.com

 

From the website: “Sterling silver bubbles come together to form tactile clusters on these Effervescence Bubble Stiletto Earrings. Lavender iolite stones echo the iridescence of bubbles, creating perfect jewellery for evening glamour.”

I think the churning of bubbles is a unique inspiration for jewelry creation.

The photo above is heavily photoshopped. The actual earrings are not so dark.

Photo credit: www.collinsjewellers.com
Photo credit: http://www.collinsjewellers.com

The earring stud which pins to the earlobe is made of sterling silver and lavender iolite. A thin chain extends downward and ends at a sterling silver ball with a corrugated texture. The length of the drop is 3.6 cm/1.4 inches.

Kate wore these to the Trooping of the Colour in 2012.

 

Photo credit: www.commons.wikimedia.org
Photo credit: http://www.commons.wikimedia.org

 

I love seeing her in cool tones. She looks lovely in ice blue and bright silver.

These earrings cost $225 on the U.S site.